We drove pproximately 4000 KM and these are literally the only olorful flowers I saw. Literally. Somewhere between Abeche and Biltine.

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This area is called Bichagara. It’s dotted with these massive, beautiful wind-sculpted towers made of sandstone. The plains of Bichargara are so vast, there’s no way to give perspective, but the towers are mountain-sized.

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Between Sabi and the Mourdi Depression.

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Between Grand Riparo and Achwile. (For perspective, that is a man in the middle running towards us.)

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We joked the Mourdi Depression got its name because anything that has to endure living there must be depressed. This tiny tree clings to live among massive sand dunes, rocky valleys, and fierce, unrelenting wind.

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We climbed a 1000 meter rock formation, at the top of which were fossils called, Harlania Enigmatca, impressions and casts of the first forms or organized life on earth, which paleontologists agree are 570 to 370 million years old. But they can’t agree whether they are plants or animals.

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The Todi region, so named because it’s close to the Todi Well. As water is sparse in the Sahara, where there are wells there are animals, and thus poop.

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Strong winds form massive Barchan sand dunes – which we had to transverse – somewhere between Sabi and the Mourdi Depression.

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Navigating the Mourdi Depression’s rocky valley and massive sand dunes is punishing and not for the inexperienced. My drivers expertly guided our off-road crossing without GPS, and yet , even we got stuck. Here’s Habdullay coming to help us push our car, in fierce, harsh 40 mile/hour winds blowing sand, dust and grit no less.

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Sunset, approximately 30 KM south of Abeche.

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Achwile.

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Full moon in the sky at 4 PM. The dust in the sky is caused by the Harmattan, a cold-dry and dusty, sandy, gritty trade wind that relentlessly blows between the end of November and middle of March.

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View from atop Grand Riparo.

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Bahr el Ghazal.

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Sunset at Wadi Archeii.

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In this particular area between Grand Riparo and Achwile. The land was so barren, and the wind was horrendously bad. It was so lonely and beautiful at the same time. Like most of
Chad, I couldn’t believe people lived there.

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An abandoned French fort from during the time of their occupation. Somewhere between Saline de Hotro and Madadi.

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You see this a lot in Chad. One tree, by itself, not another tree in sight for as far as you can see in any direction. This one between Demi and Tegudei.

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Giant sandstone rock formations engulfed by even large sand dunes in Ogius, in the Kora region.

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The sky became colored because the strong wind was blowing so much sand and dust around. Derbili.

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