Driving from where I was staying at Whichaway Camp (70’ 45’ 49’ S, 11’ 36 59 E) on the Schirmacher Oasis, to the ovolazarevskaya the ice strip, which services the Russian research station, to fly to FD 83, the Pole of Inaccessibility, to refuel en route to the South Pole.

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At FD 83, aka Fuel Depot 83-degrees South, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the most remote and difficult spots to reach in Antarctica where there is nothing except an ice runway, a cache of fuel barrels parachuted in by a Russian transport plane, a handful of tents and vehicles, and the five men who wait to refuel planes like ours that land en route to the South Pole.

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At FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, which is one of the most remote and difficult spots to reach on the planet, with the world’s coldest year-round average temperature of -72.8°F, as reflected in the goggles of my fellow traveler, a former NASA astronaut and Commander of the Space Station.

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At FD 83, aka Fuel Depot 83-degrees South, The Pole of Inaccessibility, which is basically a seasonal makeshift gas station in possibly the most remote and most difficult spots to reach on the planet, refueling our converted DC-3 Basler en route to the South Pole, which is 878 km away.

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We spent the night at FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, on our way back from the South Pole. It is considered more remote and harder to reach than even the South Pole, which is 878 km away. It has the world’s coldest year-round average temperature of -72.8°F and nothing but an ice runway and these tents, which we spent the night in.

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Refueling our DC-3 Basler at FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the point on the Antarctic continent most distant from the Southern Ocean, and the most challenging spots to reach owing to its remoteness from geographical features that could provide access.

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Our converted DC-3 Basler at FD 83, aka Fuel Depot 83-degrees South, The Pole of Inaccessibility, a summer season-only, makeshift gas station in one of the most challenging spots to reach on the planet. Fuel barrels are parachuted in, and five men travel 1900 kilometers over 90 days to be on hand to refuel the few planes like ours that stop en route to the South Pole.

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At FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the point on the Antarctic continent located the furthest from any ocean, and considered more remote and harder to reach than even the South Pole, which is 878 km away. It has the world’s coldest year-round average temperature of -72.8°F.

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Our DC-3 Basler landed on skis at FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the most remote spot in Antarctica (and hence, the world), where five men who traveled 1900 km over 90 days to be there, hand pumped fuel from barrels that were parachuted in by a Russian transport plane at the beginning of summer.

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Our DC-3 Basler landed on skis at FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the most remote spot in Antarctica (and hence, the world), where five men who traveled 1900 km over 90 days to be there, hand pumped fuel from barrels that were parachuted in by a Russian transport plane at the beginning of summer.

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Refueling our DC-3 Basler at FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, where there is literally nothing except an ice runway, a cache of fuel barrels parachuted in by a Russian transport plane at the beginning of summer, a handful of tents and vehicles, and the five men who wait to refuel the few planes that come through.

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At FD 83, The Pole of Inaccessibility, the point on the Antarctic continent located the furthest from any ocean, and considered more remote and harder to reach than even the South Pole, which is 878 km away. It has the world’s coldest year-round average temperature of -72.8°F.

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Antarctica

POLE OF INACCESSBILITY

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